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PANAMA CANAL
Written By: Sean Rox
*Click images below to view larger versions.
PANAMA CANAL
Coral Princess transits though the Gatun Locks
PANAMA CANAL
Resourceful Coati shakes down visitors for snacks
PANAMA CANAL
Sunrise on the Panama Canal
PANAMA CANAL
Sean & Cassandra at the Gamboa Rainforest Resort
PANAMA CANAL
The Aerial Tram glides through the Rainforest Canopy
PANAMA CANAL
Sean does his best Tarzan impression on a Jungle Vine
PANAMA CANAL
Gamboa Resort Riverside Pool
    Hola, welcome to the Panama Canal!   One of the great engineering feats of the 20th century, the completion of the Panama Canal connected the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean.  This reduced the sailing time from New York to San Francisco by nearly 8,000 miles.  The Panama Canal opened in 1914 and is a must-see destination on traveler’s bucket lists. A vital trade route, the 51 mile route cuts through dense jungle and sheer granite.  Over one million ships have made the journey paying an average price of $450,000 per crossing. In 1999 the United States transferred ownership of the Canal to the Panamanian government. At the end of 2015 a $5.25 billion expansion should be complete that will provide faster transit times and accommodate larger vessels.  About 14,000 ships pass through each year collecting about 1.8 million in tolls for the convenience of the 8-10 hour voyage.
    We entered the canal via the Gatun locks on the Atlantic side.  An intricate set of locks create a three-step process that lifts vessels 85 feet above sea level onto Gatun Lake.  The complete transit would  lower the ship 31 feet at the Pedro Miguel Locks and another 58 feet at the Miraflores Locks before exiting into the Pacific.  We opted for a partial transit that sailed on Lake Gatun for the day and then made a U-turn back through the Gatun Locks to the port city of Colon. We entered the Locks at sunrise.  The journey from the Gatun Locks to the Lake took about two hours.  Once upon the lake we tendered to shore for an excursion to the Gamboa Rainforest Resort. Nestled at an intersection of the Canal and the Chagres river, the resort boasts 340 acres of luxurious pools, restaurants and gardens.  The surrounding pristine rain forest hosts an incredible 525 species of birds, 105 species of mammals and 124 species of amphibians and reptiles. After a scenic drive we arrived at the amazing resort and enjoyed a coffee before heading into the forest.  We saw an amazing array of color and beauty at a butterfly sanctuary. Local turtles, crocs and snakes were on display at an animal sanctuary along the jungle route. As we ventured deeper we were greeted by an adorable wild coati that entertained the guests for food. Our destination was an aerial tram in the heart of Soberania National park. After exploring the rainforest on foot, we boarded the tram for a 20-minute ascent through the canopy. At the summit we enjoyed spectacular views of the jungle, river and canal from an 85 meter perch.  Being in such a dense jungle gave us a healthy respect for the time and effort required to complete the Panama Canal (more than 25,000 people died during the construction).
    After the full day tour we enjoyed a hearty native feast of fresh Octopus, Fish, Plantains, veggies, plantains and rice at a seaside shanty in Colon. We found a beautiful porcelain coati figurine to remind of us of our furry friend in the wild.
    We quite enjoyed our trek through Panama and would definitely recommend seeing this engineering marvel up close.  The partial transit was budget friendly (about half the price of a full transit cruise).  The weather is always warm and the people we met were friendly and informative.  Adios Panama, we hope to make it back some day!
 
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